Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is an Additive Manufacturing method that uses high powered laser to melt metallic powders together to shape the product from a 3D CAD data. Renishaw, the founder of this technique, uses a high powered ytterbium fibre laser to fuse metal powders. The recoater sweeps a layer of fine material powder and makes it ready for the laser to fuse them according to the 2D cross section of each layer under a tightly controlled inert atmosphere. When the part is made completely, it goes for the required heat treatment and post processing. Typical applications for laser melting technology are functional testing of production quality prototypes, manufacturing of organic or highly complex geometries, low volume manufacturing of complex metal parts in specialist materials.

The industry standard term, chosen by the ASTM F42 standards committee, is laser sintering, although this is acknowledged as a misnomer because the process fully melts the metal into a solid homogeneous mass. The process is also sometimes referred to by the trade names DMLS or LaserCusing. A similar process is Electron beam melting (EBM), which, as the name suggests, uses an electron beam as the energy source.

 

Selective Laser Melting (SLM) video


Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capabilities

Abbreviation: SLM
Material type: Powder (Metal)
Materials: Stainless steel, Aluminum, Titanium, Cobalt Chrome
Max part size: 250 x 250 x 300 mm
Min feature size: 0.005 in.
Min layer thickness: 0.0020 in.
Tolerance: +/- 0.05 mm
Surface finish: Strong
Build speed: Low
Applications: Functional testing of production quality prototypes, manufacturing of organic or highly complex geometries, low volume
manufacturing of complex metal parts in specialist materials.

 

Source:

Wikipedia

2 comments

  1. Hi popular3dprinters.com!

    Im currently doing a master thesis within additive manufacturing and would like to use the SLM-image that you published.( http://www.popular3dprinters.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/SLM.jpg )

    Do you own it? And am I allowed to use it?

    Best regards Anton

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